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The need for preventive and curative services for malaria when the military is deployed in endemic overseas territories: a case study and lessons learned

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dc.contributor.author Fernando, S.D.
dc.contributor.author Booso, R.
dc.contributor.author Dharmawardena, P.
dc.contributor.author Harintheran, A.
dc.contributor.author Raviraj, K.
dc.contributor.author Rodrigo., C.
dc.contributor.author Danansuriya, M.
dc.contributor.author Wickremasinghe, R.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-03T08:03:20Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-03T08:03:20Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Military Medical Research. 2017; 4: 19 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2054-9369 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.issn 2095-7467 (Print)
dc.identifier.issn 2054-9369 (Linking)
dc.identifier.uri http://repository.kln.ac.lk/handle/123456789/8
dc.description Indexed in MEDLINE en_US
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Sri Lanka has been free from indigenous malaria since November 2012 and received the WHO certificate for malaria-free status in September 2016. Due to increased global travel, imported malaria cases continue to be reported in the country. Military personnel returning home from international peace-keeping missions in malaria endemic countries represent a key risk group in terms of imported malaria. The present study intended to characterize the potential causes of a malaria outbreak among the Sri Lankan security forces personnel deployed in the Central African Republic (CAR). METHODS: Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey distributed among Sri Lankan Air Force personnel who had returned from United Nations peace-keeping missions in the CAR region. A pre-tested questionnaire was used for the data collection, and focus group discussions were also conducted. RESULTS: One hundred twenty male Air Force personnel were interviewed (out of a group of 122 officers and airmen). All participants were deployed in the CAR for 14 months and were aware of the existence of chemoprophylaxis against malaria. The majority of the subjects (92.5%, 111/120) also knew that prophylaxis should be started prior to departure. However, the regular use of chemoprophylaxis was reported by only 61.7% (74/120) of the sample. Overall, 30.8% of the participants (37/120) had 44 symptomatic episodes of malaria during deployment, and one person succumbed to severe malaria. All cases were associated with noncompliance with chemoprophylaxis. CONCLUSION: Better coordination with overseas healthcare services and the establishment of directly observed chemoprophylaxis may help to avoid similar outbreaks in the future. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_US
dc.subject malaria en_US
dc.title The need for preventive and curative services for malaria when the military is deployed in endemic overseas territories: a case study and lessons learned en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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