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Association Between Child Maltreatment and Constipation: a School Based Survey Using Rome III Criteria

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dc.contributor.author Rajindrajith, S. en_US
dc.contributor.author Devanarayana, N.M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Lakmini, C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Subasinghe, V. en_US
dc.contributor.author de Silva, D.G.H. en_US
dc.contributor.author Benninga, M.A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-29T09:43:31Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-29T09:43:31Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2014; 58(4): pp.486-90 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0277-2116 (Print) en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1536-4801 (Electronic) en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://repository.kln.ac.lk/handle/123456789/2337
dc.description.abstract Child abuse leads to multiple physical and psychosomatic sequelae. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between child abuse and constipation among schoolchildren. METHODS: Children 13 to 18 years of age were selected from 4 semiurban schools in Gampaha District, Sri Lanka. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Information regarding socio demographic factors and gastrointestinal symptoms, child abuse, and somatisation were collected. Constipation was diagnosed using Rome III criteria. RESULTS: A total of 1792 children were included in the analysis (boys 975 [54.4%], mean age 14.4 years, standard deviation [SD] 1.3 years). One hundred thirty-eight (7.7%) fulfilled Rome III criteria for constipation. The number of children exposed to physical, emotional, and sexual abuse were, respectively, 438 (24.4%), 396 (22.1%), and 51 (2.8%). The prevalence of constipation was significantly higher in those exposed to sexual (5.8% vs 2.6% P = 0.03), emotional (40.9% vs 20.8%, P < 0.0001), and physical abuse (41.6% vs 23.2%, P < 0.0001). Mean somatisation score was higher in the total group of abused children with constipation (mean 18.6, SD 12.5) compared with those without (mean 13.9, SD 12.3; P = 0.027). Children with a history of abuse did not seek health care more often than children without this history. Patient-perceived severity of bowel symptoms was higher in children with physical abuse (23.7 vs 19.7 P = 0.001) and emotional abuse (25.4 vs 19.3 P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Childhood constipation shows a significant association with physical, sexual, and emotional abuse. Children with constipation complain of more somatic symptoms and bowel symptoms when they are exposed to abuse.
dc.publisher Lippincott Williams and Wilkins en_US
dc.title Association Between Child Maltreatment and Constipation: a School Based Survey Using Rome III Criteria en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.department Paediatrics en_US
dc.identifier.department Physiology en_US
dc.creator.corporateauthor North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition en_US
dc.creator.corporateauthor European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition en_US
dc.creator.corporateauthor European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition en_US
dc.description.note Indexed in MEDLINE en_US


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